Coronavirus (COVID-19) and Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

Global Alliance of Sickle Cell Disease Organizations Statement on Coronavirus (COVID-19) 1. A brief overview about Coronavirus (COVID-19) Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak started in late 2019 and developed into global pandemic by March 2020. In some countries, this virus is spreading very quickly with some people dying from it. Even though this disease is new and information about its spread and possible complications in SCD is unknown, it is crucial to avoid catching this infection or spreading it to those around you. SCD is considered an immuno-compromised condition, which makes those living with sickle cell disease more susceptible to infections. We hope this Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic comes to an end soon but at present, there is no timeline for Covid-19, therefore it is advisable to take precautions to stay healthy. 2. What are the symptoms of Coronavirus (COVID-19)? People who get infected with this virus may have no symptoms at all or have very mild and barely noticeable flu like symptoms. However, some may have high fever and respiratory symptoms as cough, difficulty in breathing and sore throat. In severe cases, respiratory symptoms can worsen over a short period of time and lead to fulminant lung disease necessitating admission to the intensive care and ventilatory support. Generally, children have milder disease than adults but they can transmit the virus to older people around them.People who are more likely to have severe COVID-19 disease are the elderly and those with chronic diseases. These include individuals living with SCD and other blood disorders, chronic lung disease, kidney failure on dialysis, diabetes, hypertension, cancer and those receiving drugs that decrease their immunity or who have undergone a bone marrow or solid organ transplant. In SCD, additional symptoms and signs not related to the respiratory system as severe pain and increasing pallor may be seen with Coronavirus infections. It is known that viral infections such as the flu can trigger vaso-occlusive crises (pain, acute chest syndrome) and lead to a sudden drop in hemoglobin in persons affected with SCD. While there is currently no accurate scientific data to show that patients with SCD are more likely to have severe COVID-19 disease, various studies...